Tag: ACoM

Cutting The Anniversary Cake - ACoM Environment Observatories

Celebrating the 1st Anniversary of the ACoM Environment Observatories

In December 2020, representatives of ACoM, researchers of the Solomon Islands National University, government officials and “Green Apostles” from the ACoM Environment Observatory test sites came together at Red Beach, Honiara, to celebrate the 1st anniversary of the establishment of the first ACoM Environment Observatories.

Honourable guests who followed ACoM’s invitation to the event included His Excellency Dr Brian Jones, British High Commissioner to the Solomon Islands, Mr Hudson Kauhiona, Director of the Climate Change Office at the Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology (MECDM) in Honiara, Mr Barnabas Tahoo, Director of the Meteorology Department at MECDM, and Dr Michael Ha’apio, Director of the Solomon Islands National University.

Cutting The Anniversary Cake - ACoM Environment Observatories
From left – Red beach Sikaiana representative, Dr. Jones, Dr. Mataki and Rev. Kelaepa cutting the anniversary cake

The festivities around the 1st anniversary of the ACoM Environment Observatories provided an ideal forum to reflect upon the origins and implementation of the observatory project. Voices from the test sites at Fanalei, Walande, Selwyn College and Red Beach were heard. The “Green Apostles”, who conduct and document measurements of temperature, rainfall, water levels and shoreline positions for the observatories, shared their thoughts on past experiences, challenges and future opportunities.

Population growth and sea level rise resulting in a lack of land for gardening were concerns highlighted by the representatives from the test sites in South Malaita. Both communities currently face challenges of relocation and are in need of support to obtain land for settlement and gardening. Representatives of Sikaiana community at Red Beach reiterated the concerns about sea level rise and mentioned the additional challenge of changing weather patterns, which impact crop harvests across the country.

Speeches by government officials and the observatory project staff confirmed that for Melanesians, climate change is not a challenge of the future, but one that is already being lived in the here and now. 

The observatory project aims to address the climate emergency by taking a two-way approach, combining knowledge transfer and local awareness raising, with the creation of scientific evidence of climate change and political engagement. Clergy and community members in Solomon Islands are equipped with the necessary skills to create trusted, scientific evidence of environmental change, which will be shared with policy makers and other stakeholders. At the same time, the observatories positively affect local adaptation in Anglican communities as knowledge about climate change and strategies for sustainable and environment-friendly livelihoods are shared amongst the community members.

The reflections by the “Green Apostles” during the festivities for the project’s 1st anniversary confirmed that the concept is working. The community representatives expressed their great appreciation for the project and highlighted that the engagement with the observatories has sparked discussions about possibilities for community-led adaptation at the test sites. For the future, the “Green Apostles” expressed their interest for greater engagement with policy makers to bring about positive change in their communities, especially with respect to relocation. 

ACoM Environment Observatories - Guests
Group photo of the guests, representatives from the four test sites and staff from ACOM head office
Un Goal 13 - Climate Action

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impact

More information about;
Climate Change – United Nations Sustainable Development
Climate Action – Why It Matters

ACoM Communications

Naomi Hovell Maitani

Recognising & Preparing for Climate Change

Naomi Hovell Maitani

Halo Olketa! My name is Naomi Hovell Maitani and I am from South Malaita in the Solomon Islands.

Climate Change is a global issue but little has been done about it. I resided at Selwyn College National Secondary School for six years (2015-2020) and my interest in climate change issues emerged in 2016. I watched the shoreline while traveling to Honiara from Selwyn College and back and I could tell that the coastline had been eaten away by the waves and tides. This also applies to our other islands in the country. I usually spend my holidays at my home village of Oloha, South Malaita, and the roots of the trees grown at our shoreline have also been eaten away by the waves and tides. It is my hope that the understanding about climate change, its impact and human adaptation to climate change will reach our rural areas. That is to prepare them and to keep them alert and safe.

I met my friend Marie Schlenker in late 2019 when the ACoM Environment Observatory began. We installed a rain gauge, a thermometer, shoreline poles and conducted GPS measurements of shoreline and vegetation positions on the Selwyn College shoreline. When Marie returned to the UK, I continued to help Freda with the shoreline and vegetation recordings. So much has been learnt from the observatory, but there are also many challenges ahead. The observatory gives us the understanding that we need to keep records on weather and assess the shoreline closely to make predictions on sea level rise, weather patterns, hazards and disasters and to create adaptation and mitigation strategies now and for the future. As our islands are mainly low-lying islands and atoll islands, we are highly affected by climate change. Like other Pacific Islands, we need to prepare.

Tankio Paina.

Un Goal 13 - Climate Action

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impact

More information about;
Climate Change – United Nations Sustainable Development
Climate Action – Why It Matters

Central Solomons 9th Diocesan Synod

ACoM Dioceses – April 2021 Update

The 9th Diocesan Synod of the Diocese of Central Solomons (DOCS) was held at Polomuhu village from 6th to 8th April, with the theme ‘Evangelisms in Servanthood, Discipleship to Nourish & the Faithful in the Church of God’.

Around 50 members attended comprising of clergy, lay leaders, members of the Religious Orders serving in DOCS and youth representatives.

  • Central Solomons 9th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Solomons 9th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Solomons 9th Diocesan Synod

This was also the final synod for the Rt Rev Ben Seka as the Bishop of the Diocese, who will officially retire towards the end of this year.

Rt Rev Ben Seka, Bishop of the Diocese of Central Solomons
Rt Rev Ben Seka, Bishop of the Diocese of Central Solomons

Also in April the Diocese of Central Melanesia (DOCM) held their Synod at St Alban’s Parish, Bishopsdale, with the theme ‘Launch out into the deep and let down your nets for a catch’.

  • Central Melanesia 20th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Melanesia 20th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Melanesia 20th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Melanesia 20th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Melanesia 20th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Melanesia 20th Diocesan Synod
  • Central Melanesia 20th Diocesan Synod

Southern Region Youth members from St Alban’s Parish, Bishopsdale performed the welcome for the 20th Diocesan Synod.

Following the Synod this reflection was released by St Barnabas Cathedral

Reflection from St Barnabas cathedral, Honiara

ACoM Communications


AROUND 60 participants comprising of Priests, Catechists and lay Church leaders benefited from an Evangelism and Intentional Discipleship workshop and training in the Diocese of Ysabel in early April. The four day workshop and training was held at the Church of the Resurrection, Loval District, Nukufero, Russell Islands, Laweala region.

Diocese of Ysabel Evangelism and Intentional Discipleship
Diocese of Ysabel Evangelism and Intentional Discipleship – Workshop Participants and Facilitators

The overall aims and objectives of the Decade of Evangelism and International Discipleship program are: 

  • Members of ACoM should have a fresh understanding of the crucial importance of evangelism and renewal at the heart of our faith and ministry within the Anglican Church in Melanesia.
  • Members of ACoM should know that we are called to serve God in evangelism and discipleship and to offer ourselves through exercising our spiritual gifts for the building up of God’s church and advancing his kingdom in Melanesia.
  • Members of ACoM should understand the nature and purpose of evangelism and renewal in the context of Melanesia and in the light of biblical models of evangelism and ministry and visualise how these can be translated into addressing the social issues affecting Christians in Melanesia today.
  • Members of ACoM should understand the different approaches, principles and methods to be used to renew and mature Christians in their faith and relationship with God through His Son Jesus Christ, and be ready to respond to the call by the church to engage in the work of evangelism and discipleship.

The Diocese of Ysabel has four regions; LAWEALA Region with four Parishes and four Districts; JAMAKO Region with two Parishes and four Districts; TUVANO Region with eight Districts and GAOMA Region with six Districts. The Diocese covers the islands of Ysabel, Russell, Western and Choiseul provinces. 

Fr. Norman Hudson

Patteson's Cross, Nukapu

Remembering Patteson – Father Brian Macdonald-Milne

Honorary Archivist, The Melanesian Mission UK and Honorary Canon of St Barnabas’ Cathedral, Honiara, Solomon Islands, Father Brian Macdonald-Milne writes how Patteson has influenced his entire life.

Patteson's Cross, Nukapu
Patteson’s Cross, Nukapu

I was born before the Second World War, during which I became a choir boy at St Barnabas Church in Sutton, Surrey. One of my hobbies, like many boys in those days, was collecting stamps. We had very little pocket money, but stamps could be acquired in many ways, either by asking people for ones they received on their mail or using one’s small amount of pocket money to buy what one could afford. When I was about thirteen, I visited Trinity Road in Tooting, South London, as I knew that there were two places which would interest me – a stamp shop and an aquarium shop. As I passed the stamp shop, something caught my eye in the window — it was the first stamp issue for the Pitcairn Islands, a British colony in Polynesia. On closer examination, I realized that the set of stamps told the story of the mutiny on the ‘Bounty’, and I went in and bought the set.

I have always been interested in history, and the subject of the stamps set me doing some reading about the Bounty mutineers, and how they fled with some Tahitians to the uninhabited isolated Pitcairn Island to escape punishment. Their descendants later moved to Norfolk Island, having outgrown the small island of Pitcairn, where they had become Anglican Christians and been given a priest by the Bishop of London. The Reverend Mr. Nobbs moved with them to Norfolk Island, south of Melanesia, after it had ceased to be a British penal colony. From my reading I learnt that the Bishop of Melanesia, John Coleridge Patteson, had set up a school for Melanesians on Norfolk Island in 1866/7 and had also ministered to the Pitcairners there when they needed a bishop. I became interested in and inspired by this man. I asked my school chaplain if he had any books about the Church in the Pacific so that I could get a wider picture of the Churches’ work there. He said ‘I have not been asked that before. Are you hoping to go there?’ I had not considered going anywhere at that time — I was just fourteen and being prepared by him for confirmation! I replied however that it might be a good idea. He then said, ‘ Would you go as a layman or as a priest?’ That question changed my life. We had no priests in my family. Our family business in London SW19 was an engineering firm, established by my father, and I was his elder son. However, I thought and prayed and came to believe that this was a call from God, not only to the priesthood but to the Pacific. Eventually my family came to accept this totally unexpected call.

Two missionary dioceses were then associated with the New Zealand Anglican Church — Polynesia and Melanesia. I was interested in both, and even started a branch of the Polynesia Diocesan Association at Croydon Parish Church, now Croydon Minster, which I ran for a while. However, I decided that I ought to make up my mind where I should offer to serve. It was Bishop Patteson who provided the answer. I really wanted to follow in his footsteps, and also to follow — as far as I could — his example. As a teenager, I therefore contacted the Melanesian Mission office in London, and was put on their list of possible future missionaries. I left for Melanesia by ship in 1964, having been ordained as a priest in 1961. On the way from Sydney to Honiara in the Solomons by ship, we called at Norfolk Island and I was able to visit the Patteson Memorial Chapel there.

St Barnabas Chapel, Norfolk Island
St Barnabas Chapel, Norfolk Island

Bishop Patteson has guided me in how I have tried, by the grace of God, to fulfil my ministry in and for the Anglican Church of Melanesia. Like him, I taught Melanesians and prepared some of them for ordained ministry and evangelistic work. I used Melanesian languages in my work, I lived in a Melanesian way, sometimes sharing my home with Melanesians, and eventually I was adopted into a Melanesian family. I was prepared to stay in the islands — if necessary as a single man — for as long as I was wanted. I therefore owe a great debt to the man who has so deeply affected my life from early days, and whose life and martyrdom I have researched and written about. In many ways, he is still an inspiration and encouragement to me today. Thanks be to God for the humble, saintly, talented, and devoted servant of God and of Melanesia, John Coleridge Patteson.

Collect for Bishop John Coleridge Patteson

God of all tribes and peoples and tongues,
who called your servant John Coleridge Patteson
to witness in life and death to the gospel of Christ
amongst the peoples of Melanesia:
grant us to hear your call to service
and to respond trustfully and joyfully
to Jesus Christ our redeemer,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever

Amen

Fr Brian MacDonald Milne

Brian MacDonald Milne
Selwyn College Environment Observatory Student Training

Environment Observatories – April 2021 Update

ACoM’s Environment Observatories programme is now in its second year. Lessons learnt from the four test sites are being reviewed, and new sites being identified for an expansion of the programme.

Selwyn College Environment Observatory Student Training

On the first anniversary of the programme, back in December, participants gathered to share their experiences, challenges and successes. You can read more here on the programme’s new website Anglican Church of Melanesia Environment Observatory.

Just after Easter Form 1 students at Selwyn College successfully completed the ACoM Environment Observatory Short Training facilitated by Friian Quai.

Students learnt how to collect data on environmental change in their local environment, including daily measurements of temperature, rainfall, and water levels, as well as observations of long-term shoreline variability.

In the future, student groups at Selwyn College will apply the skills they learnt during the training course to monitor the environment around the school and contribute to increasing our understanding of climate change and its related issues in Solomon Islands.

Selwyn College Environment Observatory Student Monitoring

ACoM is currently seeking funding to roll out the programme to the most environmentally at-risk parishes in the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Please pray that funding comes forward for this important programme.

New Bishop - Diocese of Hanuato’o

New Bishop of Hanuato’o

Over 2,000 people witnessed the consecrated and installment of the Reverend Arthur Stanley Abui as the fourth Bishop of the Diocese of Hanuato’o (DoH), at Saint Peters Cathedral, Kirakira on Sunday 21st March.

The Most Reverend Leonard Dawea, Archbishop of ACoM officiated the ceremony, assisted by the Senior Bishop and Bishop of the Diocese of Malaita the Rt Rev Sam Sahu, the Assistant Bishop of Malaita the Rt Rev Rickson Maomaoru, Bishop of the Diocese of Ysabel the Rt Rev Ellison Quity, Bishop of the Diocese of Temotu the Rt Rev. Willie Tungale, Bishop of the Diocese of Guadalcanal the Rt Rev Benedict Loe and Retired Bishop the Rt Rev Alfred Karibongi.

Immediately after he was consecrated, the Vicar General of the DoH Rev. Clayton Maha installed the Rt Rev Arthur Abui in the episcopal chair of the Diocesan Cathedral, as a sign of his role and responsibility as chief shepherd of the diocese.

  • New Bishop - Diocese of Hanuato’o
  • New Bishop - Diocese of Hanuato’o

“I have no great intention to come on board with new ideas and developments. I would rather continue on with the vision and mission statement of the diocese passed by the 10th diocesan synod in December 2020,” the newly consecrated Bishop said in his inaugural address in the church.

“Our vision statement puts an emphasis on to hear, live and joyfully proclaim the gospel of Christ to our people. Our mission statement focuses on our baptismal ministries to build up the body of Christ, which is the church. This is trying to achieve our vision statement. Importantly to recognise and serve those who are in need in our society”, he added.

Taken from the Diocesan Vision and Mission statements, the Rt Rev. Arthur Abui said his theme for this year 2021 is “HANUA TO HANUA FOR CHRIST”, meaning the gospel of Christ should begin at home.

“The theme should germinate at home, grow at home, matured at home before it goes out to other people, communities and society. Acts of the Apostle 1.8 states, be my witnesses beginning in Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria and to the end of the World.” Bishop Abui added.

“I am confident the diocese will continue to progress through your capable leadership with the support of your clergies.” The Most Rev. Leonard Dawea told Bishop Abui in his speech during the feasting.

“There is no school for the bishopric; but by working with and listening to the people; you will learn most how to be a bishop”, the Archbishop added.

The Archbishop calls on the Diocese to support the Bishop and on all members of the church to continue to pray for the Rt Rev Arthur Stanley Abui and his family as he begins this very important role in the Diocese of Hanuato’o and in the Anglican Church of Melanesia.

New Bishop - Diocese of Hanuato’o

ACoM Communications

Becky Jacobs at Patteson's Cross

Remembering Patteson – Becky Jacobs

Bishop John Coleridge Patteson attended the King’s School in Ottery St Mary, near his family’s home, before going away to boarding school at Eton. In memory of Patteson, today one of the school’s four houses is named after him. Here Head of Patteson House, Mrs Becky Jacobs, explains why Patteson still inspires her and the King’s pupils today.

Becky Jacobs at Patteson's Cross
Becky Jacobs with students from Patteson House at the rededication of Patteson’s Cross in 2017, attended by the Rt Revd Ellison Quity and the Most Revd Leonard Dawea

I became Head of Patteson House at the King’s School, Ottery St Mary in January 2010. I was instantly intrigued by the man who was our figurehead and as an historian wanted to know all about him. I have tried to read as much as possible about him and use this information to try to translate to my students some of Patteson’s values and aspirations. I love the fact that education was at the heart of Patteson’s life and he sought not only to educate others but at a time when it was very much a privilege.  I am delighted too that he tried to include women as well as men in his quest. This was forward thinking for the 19th century.

I am fascinated with Patteson’s journey to the other side of the world and the remoteness he must have felt. I wonder if he missed East Devon. I have never been to the Solomon Islands, maybe one day I will go there. I have an image of this tall, bearded man wading ashore at Nakapu with gifts and then being tragically struck down. I am immensely proud that Patteson was an anti-slavery pioneer. Other houses at the King’s school cannot necessarily testify to the great character of their figureheads but we can…like the suffragettes Patteson’s colour (green) suggests growth and development. Again and again, education and personal belief is all important. I am proud to be able to talk about Patteson in assembly and show he is so incredibly relevant today. I can use him as a role model for students, someone who expressed a need to learn continually and someone willing to take risk, to travel and to learn about other cultures.

I have pinned my colours firmly to the mast as Head of Patteson at the King’s school. I ALWAYS wear something green every day, have some wonderful banners and I talk about Patteson’s memory often.  I was really proud that my students raised over £100, four years ago to help towards cleaning up the memorial at Patteson’s Cross. I also remember several years ago abseiling down Feniton Church tower to raise money for causes in the Solomon Islands, a great experience!

Becky Jacobs with ACoM staff
Becky Jacobs with ACoM’s General Secretary Dr Abraham Hauriasi and Mission Secretary Fr Nigel Kelaepa on a visit to the King’s School

I hope later in the year to inspire students to find a 21st century equivalent to Patteson, to partner his ideas and aspiration in the modern age. Having said that, Patteson belongs as much in the 21st century as he did in the 19th. I could not be prouder than to have this person as our House figurehead at The King’s School.

Becky Jacobs
Head of Patteson House and Teacher of History and Politics
The King’s School, Ottery St Mary, Devon

The King’s School is formally linked with the Bishop Norman Palmer School in the Solomon Islands. There have been teacher exchanges and visits, and pupils have exchanged letters and worked on joint environmental projects.

Bishop of Guadalcanal. The Rt Rev. Benedict Loe

Consecration and Installation of Revd Benedict Loe into the Office of Bishop

The Archbishop of the Anglican Church of Melanesia the Most Revd Leonard Dawea officiated at the Consecration and Installation service of the new Bishop of Guadalcanal, assisted by the Bishop of the Diocese of Central Solomons, the Rt. Rev Ben Seka and Bishop of the Diocese of Ysabel, the Rt Rev Ellison Quity and other retired Bishops.

Bishop of Guadalcanal. The Rt Rev. Benedict Loe
Bishop of Guadalcanal. The Rt Rev. Benedict Loe

Archbishop Christopher Cardone of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Honiara was the preacher at this historical ceremony.

Amongst many other points mentioned in his first address as the new Bishop of Guadalcanal; The Rt Rev. Benedict Loe highlighted the need for his clergy and lay people to come together and refloat or restrengthen the work of the ninth ship (diocese) within ACoM.

Around five thousand church goers both from the Diocese of Guadalcanal, Diocese of Central Melanesia and sister churches came to witness the ceremony despite heavy down pour a day before. Close to one hundred traditional gifts of foods (chupu) were prepared in this historical event.

  • Most Revd Leonard Dawea & The Rt Rev. Benedict Loe
  • Installation of Revd Benedict Loe into the Office of Bishop
  • Welcome ceremony
  • Most Revd Leonard Dawea & The Rt Rev. Benedict Loe
  • His Excellency the Governor General Sir David Vunagi & Lady Mary
  • Clergy & Members of the Religious Orders

Photos from the Consecration and Installation of the Right Reverend Benedict Loe as the second Bishop of the Diocese of Guadalcanal at Good Shephard Cathedral, Foxwood, East Guadalcanal, Sunday 28th February 2021.

Previously; New Bishop of Guadalcanal.

ACoM Communications

Patteson’s Cross, Nukapu

Remembering Patteson – Revd Sr Veronica CSC

Patteson’s Cross, Nukapu
Patteson’s Cross, Nukapu

‘Then he called the crowd to him along with his disciples and said: “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me and for the gospel will save it”.’ Mark 8: 34 – 36. This is the gospel reading chosen for Bishop John Coleridge Patteson’s Feast Day.

I firmly believe that these words of Jesus are ingrained and embedded in the life and ministry of Bishop Patteson. They show how he lived out his life for the sake of the people of Melanesia, and I am counted as one of those. In his diary, quoted by Margaret Cropper in Flame Touches Flame, are the words, ‘I feel the sense of responsibility deepening on me. I must go out to work without Selwyn, and very anxious I am sometimes, and almost oppressed by it. But strength will come and it is not one’s work, which is a comfort; and if I fail – which is very likely – God will place some other man in my position, and the work will go on, whether in my hands or not, and that is the real point’.

Revd Sr Veronica CSC, Alfington, Devon
Revd Sr Veronica CSC, presiding at St James & St Anne Alfington, Devon, where Bishop Patteson served his curacy before travelling to Melanesia

Having visited Bishop Patteson’s home and the church where he did his curacy, I was overcome by the fact of the Bishop leaving his comfortable dwelling to live as a homeless stranger in these islands. Spreading the Gospel was more vital to him than living in a comfortable home. Where would we be if Bishop Patteson had not made the sacrifice? Would we be still living in darkness without Christ? We owe a lot to the bishop for denying himself and taking risks for our sake. We are the very fruit of his sacrificial life and the shedding of his blood. This role model of Bishop Patteson challenges us Melanesians. Are we prepared to deny ourselves and to take up our cross for the sake of the gospel? Is the Gospel at the very heart of our lives and our ministry? If it is at the heart of our lives and our ministry, then we too will experience the joy of spreading the good news to our neighbours and living it out in our lives, families and parishes. God’s word is alive and active and we must feed on it daily. It is powerful in that it transforms and shapes our lives as believers in God.

Revd Sr Veronica CSC, Patteson’s Cross, East Devon
Revd Sr Veronica CSC, Patteson’s Cross, East DevonRevd Sr Veronica at Patteson’s Cross, East Devon

An item in this week’s news was shocking. A man was accused of sorcery and his feet and hands were bound together and were chopped off. It happened on one of the islands near where Bishop Patteson’s life was laid down. This shows that there is still much to do here in Melanesia in ministry among our people and we need to work very hard.

Our Community is working with women and children who are the victims of domestic violence. It is very sad that we call ourselves a Christian country, but domestic violence is very high in our towns, villages and homes. Although terrible things may happen in our country, we must overcome evil with good, as the Bishop left us the model. As Christians, we need to revisit our mission among our people in our islands. We must deny ourselves for the sake of the gospel. ‘Patteson’s murder was brutal, but it proved to be the seed of the Melanesian Church which grew and continues to grow from strength to strength’. Bishop Patteson brought the Good News to us. May nothing overwhelm the light of Christ within us.

Revd Sr Veronica CSC

Marie Schlenker

New Intern – Marie Schlenker

Marie Schlenker has recently joined MMUK as an intern and will support our team over the next three months. Marie is passionate about reducing inequalities in this world through sharing and caring for God’s creation. During her placement she will focus on creating new opportunities for environmental education and practical climate action.

Marie Schlenker

In her role as an intern at MMUK, Marie will take the lead in developing a climate change course for the students at the theological colleges in Melanesia, which will equip the next generation of priests with the necessary skills to incorporate climate change into their teachings and set up environment observatories in their local communities. Furthermore, she will network to increase opportunities for wider audiences in Melanesia and the UK to get involved in practical climate action, which is essential to ensure that our friends in Melanesia today and our next generations in the UK can continue to hope for a bright future.  

Marie Schlenker

Marie has a background in science and is working towards her PhD at the University of Southampton, studying climate change impacts and community relocations in Solomon Islands. With the support of MMUK and ACoM, she conducted research in remote communities in Solomon Islands in 2019, visiting the Provinces of Guadalcanal and Malaita. Furthermore, she is involved in the design and implementation of citizen-based environmental monitoring within the ACoM Environment Observatory. Before starting her PhD, Marie completed a Masters degree in Environmental Physics and volunteered as a teacher in Chile.