Author: Ian Drew

Coffee Mornings Cocoa Nights

Coffee Mornings – Cocoa Nights – December 2021

Coffee Mornings Cocoa Nights

Wednesday 1st December at 10am – 11am (and 7pm – 8pm) GMT

On  Wednesday 1st December at 10am – 11am and repeated again at 7pm – 8pm GMT, I will be hosting an online event to share the latest news from the region and from our AGM and Festival Day in the presence of our President, the Archbishop of Canterbury. The event will run for about 45 minutes to 1 hour with a short briefing from me, a time to ask questions, and finish in prayer for our friends in Melanesia.

If you would like to attend and or know others who would like to join us, please let me know and I will send a link. Do also let me know if you have any particular questions / topics you would like me to cover.

Many thanks for your continuing support and I hope to see you online soon.

Katie Drew, MMUK

Climate Change and Food Security Poster

Climate Change and Food Security

18 October 2021, 18:00 – 20:00

Care of; Global Centre and DDE (globalcentredevon.org.uk)

This is the third in a series of A FAIR COP: from Climate Crisis to Climate Justice sessions in the lead up to COP26.

Marking World Food Day (16th October), how are disrupted weather patterns affecting food security?

In Melanesia: Katie Drew (Chief Officer, Melanesian Mission)
In Mali: Caroline Hart(Coordinator, Joliba Trust) and Deborah Hutchinson (Chair, Joliba Trust)
In Devon: David Mezzetti (Exeter Growers Cooperative)

Zoom link https://us06web.zoom.us/j/84238615322?pwd=WUNxWnUrY2ZUekV6eEpIbHlUOXpJZz09


Climate Change and Food Security Poster
Coffee Mornings Cocoa Nights

Coffee Mornings – Cocoa Nights

Coffee Mornings Cocoa Nights

Tuesday 12th October at 10am – 11am (and 7pm – 8pm) BST

On  Tuesday 12th October at 10am – 11am and repeated again at 7pm – 8pm BST, I will be hosting an online event to share the latest news from the region and from our AGM and Festival Day in the presence of our President, the Archbishop of Canterbury. The event will run for about 45 minutes to 1 hour with a short briefing from me, a time to ask questions, and finish in prayer for our friends in Melanesia.

If you would like to attend and or know others who would like to join us, please let me know and I will send a link. Do also let me know if you have any particular questions / topics you would like me to cover.

Many thanks for your continuing support and I hope to see you online soon.

Katie Drew, MMUK

Walande Island

4 Week Creation Care Course – Week 1: Caring for Creation

7 October 2021, 19.30-21.00

This 4-week Creation Care Course is a unique collaboration between The Diocese of Chester, HeartEdge, Melanesian Mission UK and Southampton University.

In this 4-week Creation Care Course, we will provide you with vital information about climate change, its impacts on people, and reflect on our role as Christians in taking practical climate action.

Week 1: Caring for Creation (7 October 2021, 19.30-21.00), we will take a theological perspective on creation care and tackling climate change, using bible studies and a wide range of theological resources.

Week 2: Understanding Climate Change (14 October 2021, 19.30-21:00), we will look at climate change, its drivers and impacts from a scientific perspective.

Week 3: Living Climate Change – Stories from Melanesia (21 October 2021, 19.30-21.00), we will learn about the effects of climate change on people and draw upon examples of climate impacts and human responses in Melanesia.

Week 4: Taking Action – Caring for the Environment, Caring for People (18 November 2021, 19.30-21.00), we will hear about various options for climate change mitigation and adaptation that we can take as individuals, as parishes and as a Christian community.

Archbishop of Canterbury - Festival and AGM - Exeter Cathedral

Festival and AGM 2021

A Coming of Age

MMUK Trustee, Revd Martin Cox, reflects on the charity’s AGM and Patteson Festival Day at Exeter Cathedral on Saturday 18 September.

Archbishop of Canterbury - Festival and AGM - Exeter Cathedral

All the ‘clicks’ of the liturgical Rubik’s cube had been made and there was full alignment around the sides of the cube. This was through the hard work and negotiating skills of Katie Drew, Executive Officer of MMUK. So it was that MMUK trustees’ past and present gathered with the Archbishop of Canterbury and his wife and party, the Diocesan Bishop of Exeter, the Dean and Chapter of Exeter Cathedral, a researcher from the University of Southampton along with supporters of MMUK for this year’s Festival and AGM on a warm day in September in Exeter Cathedral.

Festival and AGM Eucharist - Exeter Cathedral

There was a significant poignancy to this year’s event as we gathered to mark the 150th commemoration of the death of Bishop John Coleridge Patteson on 20 September 1871 in the very same Cathedral where he had been ordained Deacon and Priest. The liturgical colour was red; the side of the Rubik’s cube was complete.

It was wonderful to gather together in person with several hundred others for the Festival Eucharist. The Book of the Gospels was processed in on a processional canoe. The Archbishop of Canterbury preached from the Martyrs Pulpit and spoke movingly of Patteson as a red and white martyr. Bishop Robert presided and beautifully intoned the Eucharistic prayer. Bishop Willie led the prayers of intercession in the way that only Bishop Willie can! We were reminded of the faithfulness of God and the call upon us all to be faithful. A presentation was made by the Archbishop of Canterbury to the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral of a copy of Bishop Patteson’s letter asking for more resources.

After our pre-booked packed lunch and conversations, another side of the Rubik’s cube where the clicks had led to perfect alignment, we held our Festival and AGM. Revd Richard Carter and Bishop Willie Pwa’isiho both spoke movingly of Bishop Patteson’s legacy of a spirit of service and mission, of equality of relationships in and through Christ, of the call to live simply and close to God and one another, of the importance of education and a holistic approach to mission, of the role of women who wrapped Bishop Patteson’s body following his death before he was buried at sea so his love for the people could be washed upon the shores of the islands. Bishop Willie ended by leading us in the Lord’s Prayer in Pidgin English.

We moved from looking back to the past to thinking about the present. Marie Schlenker from the University of Southampton and Kate Pwa’isiho spoke of Faith and Science in the Care of Creation. Their equally moving presentation drew attention to the impact of climate change on rising sea levels and the way of life for many. Marie spoke of the climate change observatories to collect much needed data. Kate spoke of the immediate impact on Fanalei Island. Images of coral bleaching and sand dunes in the church made a powerful impression on those gathered together. We were left with the challenge to reflect on our own lives as the decisions we take do affect the lives of others. We know this instinctively, but Marie and Kate highlighted the challenge powerfully.

Before he departed, Archbishop Justin responded to the presentations. His Grace spoke of the capacity of the Anglican Communion to tell the story of climate change, of how the Melanesian church is engaged in holistic mission and speaks the voice of the Spirit, of how peace and reconciliation are vital to create the space to engage with climate change issues: “If it’s not dealt with for everyone, it’s not dealt with for anyone.”  Archbishop Justin concluded his remarks by reflecting to us that Bishop Patteson set an example for us all, commenting that when we are at war with the world we are war with God.

Following the departure of the Archbishop of Canterbury and his party the Festival heard a recorded message from the Archbishop of Melanesia. Archbishop Leonard spoke of how Bishop Patteson was truly Melanesian oriented and how Melanesians claim him as their own for ever.  Bishop Mark Rylands, Chairman of MMUK interviewed Revd Brian Macdonald-Milne about his book, ‘Seeking Peace in the Pacific’. Brian reminded us of how God’s grace transforms human failure and failings. The Annual General Meeting of MMUK followed with a presentation to Marie in token of her work as an intern over the last year the presentation of the accounts by Steve Scoffield, Honorary Treasurer of MMUK who spoke of the need for wise decision making and a trust in God’s faithfulness going forward.  Following the re-election of three trustees’, Bishop Mark concluded the AGM by assuring us of God’s blessing.

Brian Macdonald-Milne with Mark Rylands

It was a real joy and privilege to attend the Eucharist and to be present for this year’s in-person Festival and AGM. Those I spoke to during the day echoed these sentiments and were grateful for the way in which the day had been organised. As I left the Cathedral as one of the re-elected trustees’ I was conscious that the pieces of the liturgical Rubik’s cube were now being scrambled again having been in alignment for our day together. It was ever thus. However, as a result of this year’s Festival and AGM, the occasion, the location, the participants, the presentations and the way in which the sides of our Rubik’s cube had been aligned for the moment, I was also conscious that MMUK and our support for the mission of the Anglican Church of Melanesia had somehow come of age.

Blessed are you, Lord God, King of the Universe.
By your word the evening comes,
by your power the day dawns.
You are the Lord of the tides and season.
You have set the stars in the sky.
You have placed a limit on the sea.
In your love you created all things.
By your love all has been redeemed.
Through your love all creation is sustained.
Blessed are you, Lord God, King of the Universe.

(Island of Light: An Illustrated Collection of Prayers by David Adam, SPCK 2002)

Revd Martin Cox, Diocese of Manchester, MMUK Trustee

Archbishop of Canterbury opens Patteson's Way

Archbishop of Canterbury Visits Devon on First Public Trip Since Pandemic

The Archbishop of Canterbury has visited Devon to open a new pilgrimage route on his first public engagement outside London in 18 months.

Archbishop of Canterbury opens Patteson's Ways

Justin Welby was launching the Patteson’s Way, an 8-mile circular walking route in honour of Bishop John Coleridge Patteson who grew up in Feniton, near Ottery St Mary and was killed while on a mission to share his faith in the Pacific islands of Melanesia.

Monday 20 September marked the 150th anniversary of his death.

The Archbishop unveiled a plaque at Feniton Parish Church and read out a prayer written by the church’s Storytime Group.

As we gather here today to celebrate the opening of this new Pilgrimage Route,
we give thanks for the life of Bishop John Coleridge Patteson and the example that he set us.

Let those who walk along Patteson’s Way have courage as Patteson did
when he left his home here to go to the other side of the world. 

Give them the space and quietness to reflect, see the wonders of the
world around them, hear the sounds of nature, and meet with you.

We pray for everyone in Melanesia and give thanks for the close bond
that this local area has with Melanesia as a result of Patteson’s brave journey.   

We ask your blessing for the route and that you keep all those who walk
the path safe in the knowledge that you are walking next to them.

In Jesus’ name we pray

Amen

He then blessed the first pilgrims before walking a short section of the route with them. He said “I’m ecstatic. I am seeing real people, it’s the first outside engagement I’ve been allowed for 18 months. “Devon is a county I don’t know, but it is just so wonderful and lovely. “We are not just the Church of England; we are the Church FOR England.”

The Patteson’s Way was devised by the Devon-based charity, the Melanesian Mission UK. It is being supported by Devon Pilgrim, a Church of England-funded project which has seen four new pilgrimage routes in the county this year.

Archbishop Justin said “The significance for me of pilgrimage is that you are meeting with God … and moving across the world that God created. “You meet people that surprise you and God surprises you in how he meets you.”

Sophie, who was amongst a group of Feniton Primary School pupils who sang the Archbishop a song, said “I was nervous, it was a big moment, but it was fun and exciting.”

Archbishop of Canterbury - Alfington Prayers

After Feniton, the Archbishop went on to nearby Alfington church, where Patteson was a priest, and joined the Archbishop of Melanesia, the Most Revd Leonard Dawea, online to say prayers for Patteson.

The Archbishop then preached in a service of Thanksgiving for the Church in Melanesia at Exeter Cathedral.

Archbishop of Canterbury - Festival and AGM - Exeter Cathedral

Giving a talk after the service, the Archbishop spoke about the fight against climate change, which is particularly relevant because some islands in Melanesia are already disappearing under water. He said, “Melanesia is not a canary in a coal mine but an alarm bell ringing loudly for us all, calling us to action on climate change.”

In an interview Archbishop Justin talks about pilgrimage, Patteson, climate change and the importance of rural parish churches; Archbishop of Canterbury Interview.

Diocese of Exeter

Feniton Pupil Prayers and Art

Devon School Children Send Prayers To The Pacific

School children in Devon have been working on a special project to commemorate the life of the first Bishop of Melanesia, who died 150 years ago this month and also to voice their concerns about climate change in the pacific.

Feniton Pupil Prayers and Art

Pupils at Feniton and Tipton St John Church of England Primary Schools in Devon, have a very special bond with school children in Melanesia in the pacific. For the past ten years the schools have welcomed guests from Melanesia and sent teachers to volunteer at Melanesian schools. During this time the pupils have learnt about the first Bishop of Melanesia, John Coleridge Patteson, who came from Devon, and have also heard about the devastation of climate change in the Melanesian islands today.

Executive Head, Colin Butler, said: “The children at Feniton and Tipton care deeply about what is happening to children in Melanesia because of climate change. They also wanted to commemorate that a young man from Devon went to Melanesia and died as a missionary out there 150 years ago.

  • Patteson Prayers - School Partnership
  • Patteson Prayers - School Partnership
  • Patteson Prayers - School Partnership
  • Patteson Prayers - School Partnership

“At the end of last term, the children painted pictures of Patteson growing up in Devon and then travelling to Melanesia. They have also written prayers about caring for the earth and asking for forgiveness for when we are wasteful and uncaring. The teachers at both schools are very proud of what the children have produced, and we hope the children in Melanesia like the work and see how much the children care for them and their first Bishop. Copies of the pictures and prayers will also be on display when the Archbishop of Canterbury visits St Andrew’s Church, Feniton on 18th September. “We have also just received prayers and drawings from the Melanesian school children, and we will be sharing these with the children as they return to school this week. It is wonderful to have this special relationship with children, teachers and schools over 10,000 miles way, all because a young man from Feniton, left Devon to become a missionary in Melanesia over 150 years ago,” said Mr Butler.

Exeter Cathedral

MMUK Festival Day To Remember Bishop John Coleridge Patteson

MMUK is looking forward to welcoming over 150 supporters from all over the UK to its Patteson Commemorations and AGM Festival Day at Exeter Cathedral on Saturday 18th September.

Exeter Cathedral

This year’s events will celebrate the ministry and witness of Bishop John Coleridge Patteson on the 150th anniversary of his martyrdom in the Solomon Islands. The charity’s President the Most Reverend Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury, will be preaching at the Eucharist and guest speakers will reflect on Patteson’s legacy. Exeter Cathedral has curated a new Patteson exhibition, charting the Bishop’s early years growing up and becoming a priest in Devon and being called to be a missionary in Melanesia.

Chair of the Melanesian Mission, Bishop Mark Rylands said: “MMUK is humbled and grateful that so many supporters are travelling from as far away as Scotland to be with us, as we give thanks for Patteson and celebrate our companionship with Melanesia today. We are also delighted that Archbishop Justin is joining our festival day in Devon.

Simply Living 2013, Lambeth Palace
Archbishop Justin, President of MMUK with the Simply Living UK Mission team in 2013 at Lambeth Palace

“Of course we are sorry that our Brothers and Sisters from Melanesia will not be with us, due to travel restrictions, but they have sent their prayers and greetings, which we will be sharing on the day. The service and talks will also be live streamed by the Cathedral, so our Melanesian friends and UK supporters unable to be with us in person, can still join us online.

“Patteson’s witness and legacy is alive today and our guest speakers will reflect on what we can learn from the first Bishop of Melanesia. We will also have talks on science and faith in addressing the challenges of climate change, and also on peace and reconciliation in the pacific. The day will end at the Cathedral with our Annual General Meeting.

“I would like to thank the Exeter Melanesia Link Group, the Diocese of Exeter and Exeter Cathedral for all their assistance and support in hosting this year’s special MMUK Festival,” said Bishop Mark.

Here is the programme for the day;

10.00am       Exeter Cathedral open for viewing of the Patteson 150 exhibition, refreshments available
11.30am       Seats taken for the Eucharist in the Cathedral
12.00pm       Eucharist
1.15pm         Lunch Break
2.00pm         Seats taken for the Festival Afternoon

Patteson’s Life & Legacy – Bishop Willie Pwaisiho – Diocese of Chester & Revd Richard Carter – St Martin in the Fields

Faith & Science in the Care of Creation in Melanesia – Kate Pwaisiho – Diocese of Chester & Marie Schlenker – University of Southampton

MMUK’s Plans for the Year Ahead – Bishop Mark Rylands MMUK, book launch Seeking Peace in the Pacific – Revd Brian Macdonald-Milne

Pre-recorded Closing Address & Blessing from the Archbishop of Melanesia

4.00pm         Annual General Meeting – papers for this meeting on www.mmuk.net
4.30pm         Close

There is still time to book a place at their year’s event. Please contact the charity to reserve your place.

Nukapu Beach and Canoe

Remembering Patteson – Laden Kopuria

Laden Kopuria - Selwyn College

As a form six student from Selwyn College, Honiara and originally from the island of Nukapu, where the first bishop of Melanesia shed his blood, I would like to share some of the historical story of Bishop John Coleridge Patteson, which my Grandmother has shared with me.

This short brief knowledge was passed to me, through my family from my great, great, great Grandmother whose name was Nivai from the island of Nukapu. On September 20th 1871 the Southern Cross (mission boat) sailed to Nukapu Island. During that time a village chief came down to the beach and welcomed Bishop John Coleridge Patteson into the village. He took him to a single house and let the Bishop rest while he went to the neighbouring villagers to explain to them who Bishop Patteson was.

In his absence the Chief told a young boy to take care of the Bishop while he rested. During the Chief’s absence some of the villagers were angry due to five of their young men from the Island being stolen or taken away by a blackbirding ship a few days before the Southern Cross arrived at Nukapu. The young men’s relatives were still angry so they decided to kill any white men that arrived on their shores. As soon as Bishop Patteson was resting in the house, a man named Teadule came creeping in and hit the Bishop’s head with a heavy stick. The Bishop died instantly. The other angry young men took their arrows and shot them at the ship. The arrows hit Stephen Taroniara as well and he died.

The Chief and his relatives were very sad. A woman named Nivai, my relative, dug a hole to bury Bishop Patteson. She took the body and wanted to bury it, but then they called from the ship that Bishop Patteson’s body must be taken back to them. So my relative put the body of Patteson on a wooden craft and pushed it out to the ship. The crew took the body and buried him at sea.

I am sad that the Bishop’s body was not buried safely on the island of Nukapu. Today if you go to Nukapu Island you will still see the hole which my relative had dug and the cross to remember the Bishop’s death. The Bishop’s death on Nukapu led many people on the island and across the region of Temotu to become Anglicans. Also, most Nukapu people and the diocese of Temotu have put Patteson saints into their local churches.

I have great pride that my tribe has passed down to us, the younger generations, this historical story and my relative’s part in caring for Patteson’s dead body.

I offer this short prayer;

Dear Lord,

Thank you for Bishop Patteson’s parents, for allowing their son to be the first Bishop of Melanesia. Without them there would be no Christianity on the islands of Melanesia.

Thank you Lord for Nukapu people and forgive their past sins.

Let us always remember Bishop Patteson. It was a sign of peace and love that he shed his blood on the island of Nukapu.

Let the Church of Melanesia continue to grow because of Bishop Patteson.

Let the people of Melanesia live an example of the first Bishop of Melanesia. Continue to band us together to carry out the work Bishop Patteson has set before us.

Give peace, love and hope in memory of Bishop Patteson.

Be with the Church of Melanesia Lord, so that the seed Bishop Patteson planted be a light to us, a light that never goes out

Through Christ our Lord. Amen

Laden Kopuria Yr12 Student Selwyn College